Protein - It is well documented that vegetarians supposedly lack protein sources. It is also well documented that vegetarians and vegans usually aren't deficient in protein at all. It is true, however, that vegetarian keto restricts some of the usual sources of protein for vegetarians, like beans, for example (except for these 1g net carb black soybeans).

Thanks for the info. I would be a bit concerned with some of the choices that you outlined. For example, the high amount of non fermented soy which is known to be an excitotoxin because of the release of high concentration of glutamates into the blood stream causing glutamate receptors around the body to fire until exhaustion. These types of foods are associated with a wide range of illnesses as well as helping cancers to spread more quickly around the body. As well your choice of things like canola oil have to be questioned as it is just a marketing ploy for what was known as rapeseed oil which is high in erucic acid which associated with high incidence of fibrotic heart lesions, known as Keshan’s disease, as well as disorders of the central nervous system, lung and prostate cancer, anemia, and constipation. Plus it is virtually impossible to find non GMO versions of canola oil. What is even more striking is your pushing of Splenda which is known to contribute to the development of diabetes!?! You leave me wondering as to whether you’re actually trying to help or are actually trying to market some of these products


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Starchy veggies, such as potatoes and corn, are carb-heavy, which is a no-no on the keto diet. Still, as a vegetarian, you’re likely going to consume veggies for every meal. Aim for variety. Include leafy greens, broccoli, cauliflower, peppers, mushrooms, onions, asparagus, etc. “Sea vegetables are also great additions to your diet since they provide iodine and other key minerals,” says Dr. Axe. “For help with digestion and gut health, also try to include fermented veggies in your diet every day, such as kimchi, sauerkraut, etc.”
Another food you'll find to be a good source of protein on your vegetarian keto diet is cheese, which I'm sure you could have guessed. Cheese comes in a variety of of textures, tastes and colors, but don't let this delicious ingredient fool you -it'll help you hit your protein goals! One thing to note, however, is the varying carb count in different cheeses. It ranges from a low .10 net carbs per 1 oz serving of Gruyere cheese to a higher 1.5 net carbs per 1 oz serving of Swiss cheese. 

Fasting may sound crazy, but it has its benefits. Intermittent fasting makes it easier to restrict your calories by limiting the amount of time you have to eat. This also makes it tough to over-eat at meals since you have less meals to get to your macros, which will greatly aid you in your weight loss journey. Fasting can help you enter ketosis sooner, especially if your fasting window is large. 

Better brain health – Ketones are your body's natural nootropics. They're a more powerful source of energy than carbs and protein, providing a constant influx of energy to the brain. Carbs, on the other hand, lead to blood sugar spikes and crashes, which can lead to brain fog. The anti-inflammatory and antioxidant action of ketones also helps protect the brain against free radical damage.

Saxenda® is an FDA-approved prescription injectable medicine that may help some adults with excess weight (body mass index [BMI] ≥27) who also have weight-related medical problems or obesity (BMI ≥30), lose weight and keep it off. Saxenda® should be used with a reduced-calorie meal plan and increased physical activity. Click here for full Indications and Usage.


The diet of the moment is the ketogenic plan—people turn to it to lose weight, to manage chronic illness, or to find a healthier lifestyle. This high-protein plan focuses on meat, however. The goal is to eliminate carbs, jack up the protein, and force the body to burn fat for fuel (instead of its preferred source: carbohydrates). This phenomenon is called ketosis—but the meat focus prevents vegetarians from experimenting with the plan. Now there’s a vegetarian keto diet—dubbed ketotarian—that draws on nonmeat sources of protein. Here’s what you need to know about the vegetarian keto diet. Read the 13 things people get wrong about the keto diet.
One solid piece of advice is to, no matter how tempting it is, try to avoid telling anyone that you've started vegetarian keto. I know many people use this as a tactic to publicly commit themselves to a diet, but a niche diet like this comes under a lot of ridicule. Having people intruding on and questioning your personal choices so much can be discouraging and frankly, annoying. Share at your own risk.
As with any healthy diet plan, and especially a vegetarian one, be sure you're consuming a diversity of plant-based whole foods like fruits and vegetables. Popular vegetables to eat as a part of the keto diet are green peppers, spinach, lettuce, green beans, and cabbage, among others. Try to avoid starchy and carb-heavy vegetables like potatoes. As for fruit, some people recommend avoiding too many berries or citrus fruits, which contain natural sugars (aka carbohydrates). However, this doesn't mean you should avoid them completely. As always, eating a colorful and varied diet, no matter the plan you're following, is key to maintaining good health and wellness. If you need some inspiration when dreaming up new vegetarian/keto recipes, invest in a cookbook (the one above includes a 30-day meal plan).
Instead of Butter use Coconut Oil or Vegan Butter. Coconut oil has a slightly lower melting point than butter and the same smoke point as butter, which makes it a good butter replacement. If you are not a fan of the flavor of coconut oil, look for vegan butter in your local health food store. Make sure the vegan butter doesn’t contain any hydrogenated oils because these oils increase the risk of heart disease tremendously.
Eating a bowl of this oatmeal will increase your intake of omega-3 fatty acids, which are crucial since the keto diet demands high amounts of healthy fats. Even if you're not eating keto, you should probably be eating more of them anyway, as omega-3s can boost your heart health and have been linked to better brain and eye function. This recipe is loaded with ingredients that are excellent sources of the healthy fatty acids, such as hemp seeds, chia seeds, and walnuts.
According to nutritionist Isabel Smith, MS, RD, CDN, the ketogenic diet "is basically low-carb, high-fat, and moderate protein." Generally, it consists of 70% fat, 20% protein, and 10% carbohydrates. The goal of this diet is to put the body in a state of ketosis, which means you're body burns fat as its main energy source—not carbs or protein. People say it could aid in healthy weight loss, decrease inflammation, and more. But what many people don't know is if it can pair with a vegetarian lifestyle since it so strictly emphasizes fat and protein over carbohydrate consumption. It's no secret that many followers of the keto diet load up on meat and fish, which makes the diet seem rather murky and unapproachable for vegetarians.
But what if a vegetarian decides to go keto? Do people risk developing deficiencies and side effects by following a vegetarian ketogenic diet? More importantly, is this type of diet even sustainable? The short answer is yes – a keto vegetarian diet can be nutritious, sustainable, and healthy when you plan it right. It can also be satisfying enough to make you stick for the long haul.
However, keep in mind that weight-loss results aren’t just measured by the number on the scale—in fact, the scale can be deceiving, says Dulan. See, your new diet and exercise regimen burn fat—but you’re also building muscle, which weighs more than fat and can prevent the scale from shifting. And that’s not a bad thing because building muscle mass fires up your metabolism to torch more calories even when you’re not working out. 
My weight loss has definitely slowed like it normally does after the first 2 weeks, but I also think I was getting a little too comfortable with my cheat days.  I let them happen more frequently than I should have.  So now, going into the month of February, I’ll be more diligent about not cheating unless it’s the right day, rather than just deciding on a whim to have a cheat day, just because I wanted what everyone else was having.  I’m going to be traveling to Breckenridge, Colorado for a ski trip this month, so I’m sure that the trip will be difficult on me.  At least, I’ll probably burn a lot of it while I’m skiing. #ketoacidosis
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