The best option is to, of course, read your nutrition labels thoroughly and track your nutrients using one of the apps mentioned here. For vegetables or foods that you pick up at the farmer's market or other food that lacks nutritional information, this spreadsheet covers the carb count for a huge number of foods and drinks. This spreadsheet will save you so much time.
Speaking of skiing…  I also need to begin exercising more frequently.  That will be my big push this month.  I’m already in a 5k preparation group at our church, but that’s only once a week and I’m not running.  I’m walking.  I’m supposed to walk 2 more days a week, but sometimes I let that slip.  I’m also planning to start the 15 minute T-tapp workout.  When I do this workout regularly, I drop inches like crazy.  In fact, I was just reading testimonials from last year’s T-Tapp 60 Day Challenge and saw where one lady lost over 50 inches from just doing that 15 minute video and some basic walking.  Craziness!  I’ll be starting the 60 Day Challenge again on the 20th of February.  Feel free to join me.. after all, you can get away with just 15 minutes a day… and some consistency!
Salad bowl again, this time a little more decked out! Spinach & arugula base (covered in mct oil, apple cider vinegar & @bragglivefoods nutritional yeast!) topped with 2 radishes, 1/4 cup of raw broccoli, 1/4 cup of red cabbage, 1/2 avocado, a @fieldroast field burger and 1oz of @treelinecheese cashew scallion cheese! I have never been so in love with a salad 😍- Meal Totals: 641.7 cals / 43g fat /42.2g protein /18 Net Carbs
To get an idea of what that entails, consider that an average-sized person who eats about 2,000 calories a day will need 100–200g protein daily (on the lower end for strict keto dieters, and on the higher side for those going the Mod Keto route). A three-quarter cup serving of sunflower seeds nets you 25–30g protein, but also costs you 10g of carbs. Almonds have a similar protein-to-carb ratio at 30g to 15g per cup. The key is to accumulate enough protein from vegan sources without letting your carbs creep up too high.
Unfortunately, carbs are secretly in everything. Once you start consistently reading the nutritional labels of your foods, you'll realize that food manufacturers are constantly trying to put sugar in the weirdest foods. Chili, peanut butter, fake meat, etc. sometimes have significant grams of sugar in them that could add up over the course of a day.

Anyone following a plant-based ketogenic diet will be well familiar with zoodles. These veggie noodles are supposed to take the place of pasta or wheat noodles in your favorite dishes – but they often leave you wanting. Well, no more my friends! This is a vegan zucchini recipe that’s well worth dusting off your spiralizer for! It’s fresh, flavorsome, and feisty. The secret is in the sauce…
Fat is important on the keto diet, but especially so if you are vegan or vegetarian. “Aim to get 75 percent or more of your calories from plant-based fats like coconut oil, coconut cream/butter, MCT oil, olive oil, avocado, and—in lesser amounts—nuts and seeds,” says Dr. Axe. “Keep nut and seed consumption to about 1/4 cup per day (or two tablespoons of nut butter), since these do provide some carbs and can also be hard to digest in large amounts.” To help with absorption of minerals, he recommends soaking or sprouting nuts first.
Although it’s just recently entered the limelight in the past few years, the ketogenic diet actually has a pretty extensive history that stretches back for centuries. Since at least 500 B.C., fasting has been used as a natural method to treat epilepsy. In the 1920s, the ketogenic diet was developed as a way to mimic the effects of fasting and aid in the treatment of seizures in children. (1)
Of course, one of the big complaints about a keto diet is that—like a vegan approach—it’s very restrictive and can be hard to stick to. That’s why we like to make people aware of a slightly less rigid approach we call Mod Keto that offers much of the same benefits as a strict keto diet but is much easier to follow long-term. With Mod Keto, carbs are raised to about 20% of your total caloric intake, protein to 20–40%, and fat is reduced to 40–60%. While not technically ketogenic (your body will probably not produce appreciable ketones at these levels), the higher protein and carb allowance supports workouts and activity better while still stabilizing blood sugar and promoting fat burning.
But what if a vegetarian decides to go keto? Do people risk developing deficiencies and side effects by following a vegetarian ketogenic diet? More importantly, is this type of diet even sustainable? The short answer is yes – a keto vegetarian diet can be nutritious, sustainable, and healthy when you plan it right. It can also be satisfying enough to make you stick for the long haul.

The health benefits of vegan and vegetarian diets are well-documented; in fact, cutting meat out of your diet has been linked to many health benefits, including a reduced risk of cancer and heart disease. (5) Plus, just like regular keto, vegan keto results in some pretty impressive benefits as well, ranging from increased weight loss to improved heart health. (6)

I ate five to nine servings of fruits and vegetables a day, cut out fried foods, and switched from eating refined carbohydrates like white bread to complex carbs like whole-wheat bread. I promised myself that after one year of living healthfully, I'd treat myself to fast-food fries (an old favorite), but I couldn't finish them. Now my cholesterol is in a healthy range, and I still walk 30 to 60 minutes four or five days a week. Many might wonder how to reduce belly fat quickly at home with natural remedies
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