As I'm sure you've heard time and time again, a keto diet is a high fat, moderate protein, low carb diet. On a vegetarian keto diet, hitting your macros, especially protein, can be more of a challenge than for those who eat meat. Maybe you're not a fan of protein powders or the vegetarian meat substitutes you like are high in carbs. So, what options do you have?
Here, we’ve broken down our protein grocery list into animal and plant sourced — so depending on where on the plant-based eating spectrum you find yourself, you have ample choices available. If you go for soy products, try to stick to non-GMO and organic options, and pick ones that are fermented as they are even more abundant in nutrients (think organic tempeh).
Although fat makes a low-carb diet filling, studies show that protein is the most sating macronutrient by far. A common mistake for low-carbers is that they eat less protein in fear that they will go out of ketosis (as a result of gluconeogenesis). However, the truth is that you'd have to eat significantly more protein consistently to disrupt ketosis.
"I always told myself that once things slowed down at work, I’d try to lose weight. The only problem was that work never slowed down. After being overweight for several years, I finally decided to take action, but had no idea how to begin. I thought it would be a long and difficult process to slim down. Luckily, I was wrong. It turned out to be much easier than I expected and I have now lost over 40 pounds!
“Instead of the hours each day I would spend reading news feeds, journal articles, and book chapters for work and pleasure, I switched to listening to audio books, podcasts, and spoken news while briskly walking the paved trails in the large park behind my house. I relied heavily on a great smartphone app called Umano that professionally narrated long form news stories that I would have read at my desk anyway. (Sadly, it was recently acquired and shut down.) Using a Fitbit and the MapMyWalk app, I pushed myself to walk farther and more often. By August 2014, I was walking 10,000 to 12,000 steps a day.”

You’ve heard that eating from smaller plates can help you eat less, but did you know that using a larger fork can do the same? A recent study by researchers at the University of Utah found that participants eating with a larger fork - one that held 20 percent more food—at an Italian restaurant ate about 10 percent less than those who used a regular fork. Researchers believe a smaller fork makes us feel we aren’t making as much of a dent on our plate so we’ll take more forkfuls to satisfy our hunger. (Note: This only worked with large portions. When diners were served smaller meals, fork size didn’t affect their consumption). So next time you’re order a super-sized entree, ask for a bigger fork to help you eat less. And while you’re at it, stop when you’re satisfied—not stuffed.
One of the more popular diets trending nowadays is the ketogenic diet. The diet requires you to reduce your carbohydrate intake and in turn, increase your fat intake. The aim of the diet is to get your body to use fat instead of glucose as energy and fueling your body until the next meal. Apart from weight loss, the ketogenic diet has been found to be helpful in managing blood sugar levels, reduces the risk of obesity, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, polycystic ovary syndrome and even some types of cancer. Some healthy foods to consume on a keto diet are starchy vegetables, coconut oil, cheese, sour cream, avocado, meat and poultry and high-fat dairy products. Reduce sugar and salt intake. Replace white sugar with palm sugar, jaggery or honey and salt with pink salt or black salt in cooking.
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